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I began beating the drums for applying neuroscience to educational practice in a 9/28/11 blog post (see archives). Now I am delighted to ann...

Announcing a Neuro-education Journal

I began beating the drums for applying neuroscience to educational practice in a 9/28/11 blog post (see archives). Now I am delighted to announce that Elsevier publishers has started a new scholarly journal, Trends in Neuroscience Education. The title is a little misleading because it implies that articles will focus on teaching of neuroscience. On the contrary, all seven articles in the first issue dealt with applying neuroscience information to the practice of teaching and learning.

Two of the first issue articles deal with movement feedback and its affect on cognitive development. These have particular relevance to the teaching of handwriting. The present emphasis on keyboarding and the elimination of penmanship in the curriculum are apparently educationally unwise. This is particularly destructive in schools that are dropping cursive altogether. I will blog about these findings soon.

For now, reader should know that this neuro-education movement is well under way, that I will follow and report on it, and that youngsters will surely benefit. For some time now, I have been contributing to this field by informing teachers about this subject. Today, I am presenting at the Texas Middle School Association teachers' meeting on the subject "Teach Students How to Remember What You Teach." For those who would like me to do school visits and share what I know with students and teachers, check out the possibilities on my education consultant page and get my contact information from the home page of WRKlemm.com.

I assume you all know about my two memory books, one of which is an e-book for students. If you really want a more in-depth yet accessible understanding, I urge you to check out my new e-book, Core Ideas in Neuroscience.




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